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Faculty Recognition & Funding Opportunities - May 15, 2017

RECOGNITION

Brian Daly, Associate Professor and Chair of Physics and Astronomy, was awarded a three-year grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for his research project Acoustic Phonons in Nanostructures: Surface Waves, Thermal Transport, and Imaging”.  Funded by NSF’s Division of Materials Research, Professor Daly’s project will seek to demonstrate that high frequency ultrasonic vibrations known as acoustic phonons can be used to image buried nanostructures.  He will use ultrafast lasers that produce light pulses that are less than a millionth of a millionth of a second in duration in order to generate and detect these vibrations that are over 1000 times higher in frequency than medical or industrial ultrasound. The research aims to broaden understanding of how such high frequency waves behave as they travel around inside solid semiconductor materials, and will provide Vassar undergraduates with abundant research experiences in the process.

Travis Holloway, Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy, is the co-translator, along with Flor Méchain of the University of Paris VII, of Jean-Luc Nancy’s The Possibility of a World (Fordham University Press, 2017).  In this series of interviews, one of the most prominent philosophers in France reviews his life’s work.  Like Schlegel’s historian—“a prophet facing backwards”—Jean-Luc Nancy rummages through the history of art, philosophy, and politics in search of new philosophical possibilities and future political “worlds”.  Nearly thirty books by Jean-Luc Nancy have been translated into English on a wide range of issues including politics, aesthetics, literature, and philosophy. Currently, Nancy is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Strasbourg and the Hegel Chair of the European Graduate School in Switzerland.

Candice M. Lowe-Swift, Associate Professor and Chair of Anthropology, was invited to participate in an upcoming faculty seminar at Transylvania University.  Twenty-first Century Liberal Education: A Contested Concept,sponsored by the university’s Bingham Program for Excellence in Teaching, intends to contribute to a national conversation on liberal education and the mission of the liberal arts college in today’s United States.  The seminar will provide an historical overview of the best thinking about the purpose of liberal education through the ages—from the cultivation of human excellence in classical Greece and Rome, to the seven liberal arts of the trivium and quadrivium in the Middle Ages, the training of the “Christian gentleman” in early America, and the formation of the democratic and global citizen in the contemporary period. The seminar will invite participants to examine their own understanding of the concept in light of the historically evolving alternative perspectives as to its meaning.

SOME UPCOMING DEADLINES FOR EXTRAMURAL FUNDING
ARTS, HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

MAY 31 (letters of inquiry)         The Russell Sage Foundation invites Letters of Inquiry for its Social Inequality program, which supports investigator-initiated research projects that broaden current understanding of the causes and consequences of rising economic inequality. Priority will be given to projects that use innovative data or methodologies to address important questions about inequality.  Examples of the kinds of topics that are of interest include but are not limited to economic well-being, equality of opportunity, and intergenerational mobility; the political process and resulting policies; psychological and/or cultural change; education; labor markets; child development and child outcomes; neighborhoods and communities; families, family structure, and family formation; and other forms of inequality.  Two-year grants of up to $150,000 will be awarded.  The Foundation encourages methodological variety, but all proposals should have well-developed conceptual frameworks and research designs. Analytical models should be specified and research questions and hypotheses should be clearly stated. Awards are available for research assistance, data acquisition, data analysis, and investigator time for conducting research and writing up results.  For complete program guidelines, visit the Russell Sage website:http://www.russellsage.org/research/funding/social-inequality


AUGUST 9                     National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Media Projects Program supports film, television, and radio projects that engage general audiences with humanities ideas in creative and appealing ways. All projects must be grounded in humanities scholarship in disciplines such as history, art history, film studies, literature, drama, religious studies, philosophy, or anthropology. Projects must also demonstrate an approach that is thoughtful, balanced, and analytical (rather than celebratory). The approach to the subject matter must go beyond the mere presentation of factual information to explore its larger significance and stimulate critical thinking. Film and television projects may be single programs or a series addressing significant figures, events, or ideas. Programs must be intended for national distribution, via traditional carriage or online distribution. The Division of Public Programs welcomes projects that range in length from short-form to broadcast-length video.  NEH encourages projects that engage public audiences through multiple formats in the exploration of humanities ideas. Proposed projects might include complementary components to a film, television, or radio project. These components should deepen the audience’s understanding of the subject in a supplementary manner: for example, book/film discussion programs, supplemental educational websites, or museum exhibitions.  The Media Projects Program makes both Development and Production grants.

Multiple NEH funding opportunities are now open!  Match your project to an NEH grant opportunity: https://www.neh.gov/grants/match-your-project

AUGUST 21 (letters of inquiry)                The Russell Sage Foundation is accepting letters of inquiry for its Russell Sage Foundation/Carnegie Corporation Initiative on Immigration and Immigrant Integration. Grants of up to $150,000 over one or two years will be awarded for innovative research on the effects of race, citizenship, legal status, politics and political culture, and public policy on outcomes for immigrants and the native-born of different racial and ethnic groups and generations. The initiative falls under the Foundation’s Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration Program and represents a special area of interest within that program, which continues to encourage proposals on a broader set of issues.  Letters of inquiry must be received no later than August 21, 2017. Upon review, selected applicants will be invited to submit a full proposal by November 15, 2017.  See the Russell Sage Foundation website for complete program guidelines and application instructions:  http://www.russellsage.org/special-initiatives/immigration-and-immigrant-integration

SEPTEMBER 14              The Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University is accepting applications for its 2018-2019 Fellowship Program.  Stipends of up to $77,500 for one year with additional funds for project expenses will be awarded to individuals working in the creative arts, humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and mathematics to pursue projects within their fields. Fellows receive office or studio space and access to libraries and other resources of Harvard University during the fellowship year, which runs from early September 2018 through May 31, 2019.  Radcliffe Fellows are expected to devote themselves full time to the work outlined in their proposal. Since this is a residential fellowship, fellows are expected to reside in the Boston area the fellowship period and to have their primary office at the institute to participate fully in the life of the community.  The deadline for individual applications in the creative arts, humanities, and social sciences is September 14, 2017. Visit the Radcliffe Institute website for complete program guidelines and instructions: https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/fellowship-program/how-apply

SEPTEMBER 19              The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation provides fellowships for advanced professionals in all fields except the performing arts. The fellowships are intended for individuals who have already demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts. The program seeks to further the development of scholars and artists by helping them engage in research in any field of knowledge and/or creation in any of the arts under the freest possible conditions.  Fellowships provide grants to selected individuals over a period of between six and twelve months. Because the purpose of the program is to help provide fellows with blocks of time in which they can work with as much creative freedom as possible, fellows may spend their grant funds in any manner they deem necessary to advance their work.  Support is only available to individuals. Fellowships are not available for the creation of residencies, curriculum development, or any type of educational program, nor are they available to support the development of websites or blogs.  The foundation understands the performing arts to be those in which an individual interprets work created by others. Accordingly, the foundation will provide fellowships to composers but not conductors, singers, or instrumentalists; choreographers but not dancers; filmmakers, playwrights, and performance artists who create their own work but not actors or theater directors.  Grant amounts vary, and the foundation does not guarantee it will fully fund any project.  See the Guggenheim Memorial Foundation website complete guidelines and applications instructions: http://www.gf.org/about/fellowship/

OCTOBER 1                   The Samuel H. Kress Foundation is accepting applications to its History of Art grant program, which supports scholarly projects that enhance the appreciation and understanding of European art and architecture, from antiquity to the dawn of the modern era. Grants are awarded to projects that create and disseminate specialized knowledge, including archival projects, the development and dissemination of scholarly databases, documentation projects, museum exhibitions and publications, photographic campaigns, scholarly catalogs and publications, and technical and scientific studies. The program also supports activities that permit art historians to share their expertise through international exchanges, professional meetings, conferences, symposia, consultations, the presentation of research, and other professional events.  In previous years, grant amounts have ranged up to $100,000.  See the Kress Foundation website for complete program guidelines, information about previous grant recipients, and application guidelines: http://www.kressfoundation.org/grants/default.aspx?id=142

OCTOBER 1                   The Samuel H. Kress Foundation's Digital Resources program is intended to foster new forms of research and collaboration and new approaches to teaching and learning art history.  To that end, grants will be awarded to support the digitization of important visual resources (especially art history photographic archives) in the area of pre-modern European art history and primary textual sources (especially the literary and documentary sources of European art history); promising initiatives in online publishing; and innovative experiments in the field of digital art history. The program does not typically support the digitization of museum object collections.  Grant amounts will be determined on a project-by-project basis. Past grants have ranged between $12,000 and $70,000.  For complete program guidelines and application instructions: http://www.kressfoundation.org/grants/digital_resources/

NOVEMBER 3                 The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) supports teachers with the aim of ensuring equitable mathematics learning of the highest quality for all students.  NCTM invites proposals for itsPre-K-6 Classroom Research Grants program, which supports classroom-based research in pre-college mathematics education in collaboration with college or university mathematics educators.  Grants of up to $6,000 will be awarded to mathematics educators or classroom teachers currently teaching mathematics at the pre-K–6 level. The research must be a significant collaborative effort involving a college or university mathematics educator (a mathematics education researcher or a teacher of mathematics learning, teaching, or curriculum) and one or more pre-K–6 classroom teachers. The proposal may include but is not restricted to research related to curriculum development and implementation; involvement of at-risk or minority students; students' thinking about a particular mathematics concept or set of concepts; connection of mathematics to other disciplines; focused learning and teaching of mathematics with embedded use of technology (any acquisition of equipment must support the proposed plan but not be the primary focus of the grant); and/or innovative assessment or evaluation strategies.  Involvement of preservice teachers is encouraged but not required. The research should lead to a draft article suitable for submission in the Mathematics Teacher Educator, Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, or in one of the other NCTM school journals. In addition, proposals must address the following: research design, the plan for collecting and analyzing data, and the anticipated impact on student learning.  To be eligible, applicants must be a current NCTM member (on or before October 15, 2016) or teach at a school having current NCTM pre-K-8 school membership. The college or university mathematics educator also must be a member of NCTM.  For complete program guidelines and application instructions, visit NCTM online: http://www.nctm.org/Grants-and-Awards/Grants/Pre-K-6-Classroom-Research-Grants/

Rolling                          Mellon Slavic Studies Initiative   Russian, East European, and Central Asian studies are the focus of this joint publishing initiative supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation in offered in partnership with Northwestern, Pittsburgh, and Wisconsin university presses.  Northwestern seeks studies of Slavic literature, art, and culture; Pittsburgh is looking for projects in the social, political, environmental, urban, and cultural history of the former Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia; Wisconsin is especially interested in cultural and intellectual history, literary and film studies, anthropology, and human rights, with a focus on Russia and Eastern Europe.  For program details, please visit:                

http://www.mellonslavicstudies.org/submissions.htm

SOME UPCOMING DEADLINES FOR EXTRAMURAL FUNDING

NATURAL SCIENCES, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING & MATHEMATICS

JUNE 2                         Mozilla Science Lab (MSL) seeks to identify, support and develop a community of leaders in the network with the aim to transform research and the culture around science to make it more accessible, transparent, and reproducible.  As Mozilla’s mission is to ensure that the Internet is a global public resource, open and accessible to all, the 2017 Mozilla Science Mini-Grants Program invites applicants to submit project ideas that foster innovation and ultimately lead to more robust prototypes and products by expanding and enhancing the community of scientists. Successful projects will focus on one or more of the following:

Prototyping – Building tools or documentation collaboratively with others. This can be open source code, documentation, tools and technologies used in data-driven science, scientific software, discovery tools (e.g., ways of searching code, hosting services, etc.)     Community Building – These might include mentorship programs, workshops, meet-ups or other events that promote community engagement.

Curriculum – Materials might include text, visuals, and video for online or in-person training.

All projects should specifically reflect priorities that enhance our broader community efforts toward open innovation, efficiency in regards to practicing open science (lower barriers, ease of use & integration, etc.), and reproducibility (transparent research methods & results).  For complete guidelines and application instructions, please visit MSL online: https://science.mozilla.org/blog/mini-grant-cfp/

JUNE 6                         National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Research Training Groups in the Mathematical Sciences Program (RTG) intends to strengthen the nation's scientific competitiveness by increasing the number of well-prepared U.S. citizens, nationals, and permanent residents who pursue careers in the mathematical sciences. The RTG program supports efforts to improve research training by involving undergraduate students, graduate students, postdoctoral associates, and faculty members in structured research groups centered on a common research theme.  The RTG program supports efforts to improve research training by involving undergraduate students, graduate students, postdoctoral associates, and faculty members in structured research groups anchored by a common research theme. The activities need not be focused on a particular research problem; rather, it is expected that group participants will be united by common topical interests. The groups may include researchers and students from different departments and institutions, but the research-based training and education activities must be based in the mathematical sciences. RTG projects are expected to vary in size, scope, and proposed activities, as well as in their plans for organization, participation, and operation. For complete description, visit NSF online:https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5732&WT.mc_id=USNSF_39&WT.mc_ev=click

Multiple NSF funding opportunities are now open! See the full roster at https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_list.jsp?org=NSF&ord=date

JUNE 15                       The American Psychological Foundation (APF) invites applications for its Kenneth B. and Mamie P. Clark Fund, which provides an award of $10,000 to an early-career psychologist in support of his/her research and demonstration activities that promote understanding of the relationship between self-identity and academic achievement, with an emphasis on children in grades K-8.  Applicants must be an early-career psychologist (no more than ten years postdoctoral) and have received IRB approval, if human participants are involved, before funding can be awarded.  See the APF website for complete program guidelines, information about past recipients, and application instructions: http://www.apa.org/apf/funding/clark-fund.aspx

JUNE 25                       National Institutes of Health (NIH) Academic Research Enhancement Awards (AREA)

support meritorious research at undergraduate degree-granting colleges and universities in order to expose students to research and help to strengthen the research environment of awardee institutions. Projects may last up to three years, and direct costs are not to exceed $300,000.  AREA grants are renewable, and preliminary data are not required.  For complete eligibility and instructions, please visit NIH online at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/area.htm

Watch a detailed video presentation on peer review considerations for AREA applications: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VdjioTcAFWw

JULY 14                       The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service is accepting applications for its annual Standard Grants Program, supporting public-private partnerships dedicated to carrying out projects projects that involve the long-term protection, restoration, and/or enhancement of wetlands and associated uplands habitats. From September 1990 through April 2016, some 4,300 partners affiliated with 1,894 projects received more than $1.4 billion in grants and contributed another $2.8 billion in matching funds to protect, restore, and/or enhance some 33.1 million acres of habitat.  Grant amounts will be considered on a project-by-project basis.  See the Fish & Wildlife Service website for a complete program description and application guidelines:  https://www.fws.gov/birds/grants/north-american-wetland-conservation-act/standard-grants/united-states.php

AUGUST 1                     The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation seeks to further the development of scientific leadership in the field of environmental chemistry through the Postdoctoral Program in Environmental Chemistry.  A single grant of $120,000 (payable in two $60,000 installments) will be awarded to a principal investigator for the appointment of a postdoctoral fellow in environmental chemistry, with priority given to innovative fundamental research in the chemical sciences or engineering related to the environment.  To be eligible, the principal investigator must have a well-established research effort in environmental science or engineering. Those activities need not be located in a traditional department in the chemical sciences, and collaboration across departments and institutions is encouraged. The postdoctoral fellow usually is not already identified or working in the principal investigator's lab at the time of application. See the Dreyfus Foundation website for complete program guidelines and application instructions: http://dreyfus.org/awards/postdoctoral_program.shtml

SEPTEMBER 19              The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation provides fellowships for advanced professionals in all fields except the performing arts. The fellowships are intended for individuals who have already demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts. The program seeks to further the development of scholars and artists by helping them engage in research in any field of knowledge and/or creation in any of the arts under the freest possible conditions.  Fellowships provide grants to selected individuals over a period of between six and twelve months. Because the purpose of the program is to help provide fellows with blocks of time in which they can work with as much creative freedom as possible, fellows may spend their grant funds in any manner they deem necessary to advance their work.  Support is only available to individuals. Fellowships are not available for the creation of residencies, curriculum development, or any type of educational program, nor are they available to support the development of websites or blogs.  The foundation understands the performing arts to be those in which an individual interprets work created by others. Accordingly, the foundation will provide fellowships to composers but not conductors, singers, or instrumentalists; choreographers but not dancers; filmmakers, playwrights, and performance artists who create their own work but not actors or theater directors.  Grant amounts vary, and the foundation does not guarantee it will fully fund any project.  See the Guggenheim Memorial Foundation website complete guidelines and applications instructions: http://www.gf.org/about/fellowship/

OCTOBER 1                   The Whitehall Foundation assists scholarly research in the life sciences through its research grants and grants-in-aid programs. It is the Foundation’s policy to support those areas of basic biological research that are not heavily supported by federal agencies or other foundations with a specialized mission. The foundation also emphasizes the support of young scientists at the beginning of their careers and productive senior scientists who wish to move into new fields of interest. 

Research: Research grants of up to $225,000 over three years will be awarded to established scientists of all ages working at an accredited institution in the United States. Grants will not be awarded to investigators who have already received, or expect to receive, substantial support from other sources, even if it is for an unrelated purpose.

Grants-in-Aid: One-year grants of up to $30,000 will be awarded to researchers at the assistant professor level who experience difficulty in competing for research funds because they have not yet become firmly established. Grants-in-Aid can also be made to senior scientists.

Letters of Intent must be received no later than October 1, 2017. Upon review, selected applicants will be invited to submit a full application by February 15, 2018.  For complete program guidelines, information about previous grant recipients, and application procedures, see the Whitehall Foundation website:  http://www.whitehall.org/grants/

OCTOBER 5                   The Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University is accepting applications for its 2018-2019 Fellowship Program.  Stipends of up to $77,500 for one year with additional funds for project expenses will be awarded to individuals working in the creative arts, humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and mathematics to pursue projects within their fields. In addition, some support for relocation expenses is provided where relevant.  Fellows receive office or studio space and access to libraries and other resources of Harvard University during the fellowship year, which runs from early September 2018 through May 31, 2019.  Radcliffe Fellows are expected to devote themselves full time to the work outlined in their proposal. Since this is a residential fellowship, fellows are expected to reside in the Boston area the fellowship period and to have their primary office at the institute to participate fully in the life of the community.  The deadline for applications in the natural sciences and mathematics is October 5, 2017.  Visit the Radcliffe Institute website for complete program guidelines and application instructions: https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/fellowship-program/how-apply

NOVEMBER 3                 The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) supports teachers with the aim of ensuring equitable mathematics learning of the highest quality for all students.  NCTM invites proposals for itsPre-K-6 Classroom Research Grants program, which supports classroom-based research in pre-college mathematics education in collaboration with college or university mathematics educators.  Grants of up to $6,000 will be awarded to mathematics educators or classroom teachers currently teaching mathematics at the pre-K–6 level. The research must be a significant collaborative effort involving a college or university mathematics educator (a mathematics education researcher or a teacher of mathematics learning, teaching, or curriculum) and one or more pre-K–6 classroom teachers. The proposal may include but is not restricted to research related to curriculum development and implementation; involvement of at-risk or minority students; students' thinking about a particular mathematics concept or set of concepts; connection of mathematics to other disciplines; focused learning and teaching of mathematics with embedded use of technology (any acquisition of equipment must support the proposed plan but not be the primary focus of the grant); and/or innovative assessment or evaluation strategies.  Involvement of preservice teachers is encouraged but not required. The research should lead to a draft article suitable for submission in the Mathematics Teacher Educator, Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, or in one of the other NCTM school journals. In addition, proposals must address the following: research design, the plan for collecting and analyzing data, and the anticipated impact on student learning.  To be eligible, applicants must be a current NCTM member (on or before October 15, 2016) or teach at a school having current NCTM pre-K-8 school membership. The college or university mathematics educator also must be a member of NCTM.  For complete program guidelines and application instructions, visit NCTM online: http://www.nctm.org/Grants-and-Awards/Grants/Pre-K-6-Classroom-Research-Grants/

FEBRUARY 15, 2018                 AMBRF/Foundation for Alcohol Research invites applications from research projects focused on the effects of alcohol consumption on human health and behavior.  The Foundation encourages basic and clinical research, including epidemiology. Examples of valid topics include factors influencing underage drinking, the mechanisms of alcohol-related organ injury, fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, and the effects of alcohol on general health. Areas of particular interest include studies on how particular patterns of consumption (quantity of alcohol consumed, types of alcoholic beverages consumed, frequency of consumption, and context) are related to health and behavioral outcomes; and interdisciplinary, bioinformatics, and other approaches to genetic and environmental factors that influence the patterns of consumption of alcoholic beverages and related consequences.  Priority is given to projects led by young investigators.  Grants of up to $75,000 a year will be awarded for either one or two years.  See the AMBRF/Foundation for Alcohol Research website for complete program guidelines and application instructions: http://www.abmrf.org/appyling_grant

Rolling                          The Simons Foundation invites Letters of Intent for its new Targeted Grants in Mathematics and Physical Sciences program, intended to support high-risk projects of exceptional promise and scientific importance on a case-by-case basis. For projects with principal investigators at different institutions, the LOI should be submitted by the lead PI and his/her institution.  Applicants will be notified within two months of the submission of the LOI.  See the Simons Foundation website for complete program guidelines and application instructions: https://www.simonsfoundation.org/funding/funding-opportunities/mathematics-physical-sciences/targeted-grants-in-mps/

Rolling                          The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation believes that a carefully reasoned and systematic understanding of the forces of nature and society, when applied inventively and wisely, can lead to a better world for all.  The Foundation makes grants to support original research and broad-based education related to science, technology, and economic performance; and to improve the quality of American life.  The Foundation is unique in its focus on science, technology, and economic institutions. It believes the scholars and practitioners who work in these fields are chief drivers of the nation’s health and prosperity. In each grant program, the Foundation seeks proposals for original projects led by outstanding individuals or teams. 

The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is interested in projects that it expects will result in a strong benefit to society, and for which funding from the private sector, the government, or other foundations is not widely available.  For areas of interest and application instructions, visit the Sloan Foundation online: http://www.sloan.org/major-program-areas/?L=0%3FcHash%3D3abefb807773927e5a962594e662c143

Questions about funding for research and scholarship?   Contact us:

 

Judith Dollenmayer  (5376, judollenmayer)

               Associate Director, Corporate, Foundation & Government Relations

Katherine Hite  (7661, kahite)

              Professor of Political Science & Faculty Director of Research Development

Gary Hohenberger  (7092, gahohenberger)

               Director, Corporate, Foundation & Government Relations

Lori McElduff  (5490, lomcelduff)      

               Grants Office Specialist

Patricia Pritchard  (5893, papritchard)

                Director, Grants Accounting

Amanda Thornton  (5309, amthornton)

               Director, Grants Administration