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Faculty Recognition & Funding Opportunities - September 2017

                                   

 

***FACULTY FUNDING SURVEY!***


From the Faculty Committee on Research:

The Faculty Committee on Research and the Office for Faculty Research Development are interested in your input concerning how you use research committee funds and how the program meets your research needs.

At your earliest convenience, please complete the brief survey available at the following link:

https://goo.gl/forms/UB6gJW9GOuKyjcxk2

 

 

 

RECOGNITION                          

David Bradley, Associate Professor of Physics, is a recipient of the Acoustical Society of America’s (ASA) 2017 Science Writing Award for Professionals in Acoustics for Worship Space Acoustics: 3 Decades of Design, which he co-edited with Erica Ryherd and Lauren Ronsse.  The award includes travel expenses to attend the 174th ASA meeting in New Orleans, which will include formal presentation of the award to Professor Bradley and his collaborators.  ASA judges were impressed with the book’s organization, artistic layout and thoughtful blend of science and religious traditions.

 

 

Alison Spodek Keimowitz, Assistant Professor of Chemistry on the Mary Clark Rockefeller Chair, was awarded a grant by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to support her Acquisition of an Ion Chromatograph-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (IC-ICP-MS) for Research and Undergraduate Education at Vassar. Jointly funded by the Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) and Chemistry Research Instrumentation and Facilities (CRIF) programs at NSF, this acquisition will enhance research and education at Vassar and beyond: The mass spectrometer will be made accessible to students, faculty and researchers at other Hudson Valley institutions, including Marist College, SUNY New Paltz, and the Cary Institute for Ecosystem Studies, for research on regional concerns such as arsenic in local waterways and the depositional history and provenance of mercury and lead in the Catskill mountains.

John Meehan, Professor of Dance and Director of Vassar Repertory Dance Theatre, served as a jury member at the 13th International Ballet Competition (IBC) in Moscow, held in the Bolshoi Theatre from June 10-20, 2017.  Convened every four years, the Moscow IBC is one of the world’s most important ballet competitions and this year offered Grand Prix prizes worth $100,000 each.  Meehan is the current Chairman of the jury of the USA IBC.

Harry Roseman, Professor of Art, is a featured artist in the Recent Contemporary Works exhibition at the Davis & Langdale Company gallery in New York (through 30 September). Professor Roseman has also recently launched two websites: the web projects site at https://roseman.digitallibrary.vassar.edu/ and his portfolio site at http://pages.vassar.edu/harryroseman/

Visiting Assistant Professor Travis Wilkerson’s latest film, Did You Wonder Who Fired the Gun?, had its World Premiere at Sundance in January 2017.  It subsequently screened at True/False, Crossroads (SFMOMA), Dokufest (Kosovo), and in the international competition at Locarno.  The Village Voice wrote, “It's hard not to experience [it] and not get shivers up your spine - from fear, from anger, and from the beauty of Wilkerson's filmmaking.” The same publication named it one of “The Ten Best Films at Sundance 2017.” Artforum called it “one of the strongest works in a chilling Sundance Film Festival.”  Sight and Sound called it “one of the most powerful reckonings in recent American cinema,” and The New Yorker called it “genre-expanding.” Numerous screenings are upcoming, including at the New York Film Festival (9/28 - 10/16).  In August, Professor Wilkerson’s body of work was the subject of a retrospective at Dokufest (Kosovo), and earlier this summer, his collaborative work with Erin Wilkerson was included in the Slovenian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale.

Emeritus Professor of Music Richard Wilson's work for solo double bass entitled GRAVITAS was performed by Colin Corner, principal bassist of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, at a meeting of the International Society of Bassists at Ithaca College School of Music in June 2017.  That same month, Mr. Wilson's work for four clarinets entitled OUTSWAPPINGS received its premiere at The Kosciuszko Foundation in New York City in a program dedicated to "Music of Richard Wilson and Robert Schumann." On the last day of the Bard Music Festival in August, he gave a talk about the influence of Chopin’s music on Tchaikovsky, Brahms, Wagner, and Debussy.

 

SOME UPCOMING DEADLINES FOR EXTRAMURAL FUNDING

ARTS, HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES     

 

OCTOBER 1                   The Samuel H. Kress Foundation is accepting applications to its History of Art grant program, which supports scholarly projects that enhance the appreciation and understanding of European art and architecture, from antiquity to the dawn of the modern era. Grants are awarded to projects that create and disseminate specialized knowledge, including archival projects, the development and dissemination of scholarly databases, documentation projects, museum exhibitions and publications, photographic campaigns, scholarly catalogs and publications, and technical and scientific studies. The program also supports activities that permit art historians to share their expertise through international exchanges, professional meetings, conferences, symposia, consultations, the presentation of research, and other professional events.  In previous years, grant amounts have ranged up to $100,000.  See the Kress Foundation website for complete program guidelines, information about previous grant recipients, and application guidelines: http://www.kressfoundation.org/grants/default.aspx?id=142

OCTOBER 1                   The Samuel H. Kress Foundation's Digital Resources program is intended to foster new forms of research and collaboration and new approaches to teaching and learning art history.  To that end, grants will be awarded to support the digitization of important visual resources (especially art history photographic archives) in the area of pre-modern European art history and primary textual sources (especially the literary and documentary sources of European art history); promising initiatives in online publishing; and innovative experiments in the field of digital art history. The program does not typically support the digitization of museum object collections.  Grant amounts will be determined on a project-by-project basis. Past grants have ranged between $12,000 and $70,000.  For complete program guidelines and application instructions: http://www.kressfoundation.org/grants/digital_resources/

NOVEMBER 1                 Spencer Foundation Small Research Grants support education research projects that will contribute to the improvement of education, broadly conceived. Examples of previously funded projects include an experimental study of how college students use visual representations in solving math problems; a study exploring the process of racial and rural identity formation among African-American high-school students who attend de facto segregated schools in the rural South; and a mixed-methods study focused on the different types of knowledge novice and experienced teachers draw on in teaching reading comprehension.

The Small research Grants program awards grants of up to $50,000.  The Foundation will be hosting an informational webinar on Wednesday, September 20, 2017.  See the Spencer Foundation website for complete grant program guidelines, an FAQ, and application instructions: http://www.spencer.org/small-research-grants

 

NOVEMBER 2                 The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) offers the Dialogues on the Experience of War program, which supports the study and discussion of important humanities sources about war, in the belief that these sources can help U.S. military veterans and others think more deeply about the issues raised by war and military service. Although the program is primarily designed to reach military veterans, men and women in active service, military families, and interested members of the public may also participate. The program awards grants of up to $100,000 that will support the convening of at least two discussion programs for no fewer than fifteen participants; and the creation of a preparatory program to recruit and train program discussion leaders (NEH Discussion Leaders). Discussion programs may take place on college and university campuses, in veterans’ centers, at public libraries and museums, and at other community venues:  https://www.neh.gov/grants/education/dialogues-the-experience-war

Multiple NEH funding opportunities are now open!  Match your project to an NEH grant opportunity: https://www.neh.gov/grants/match-your-project

 

 

NOVEMBER 3                 The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) supports teachers with the aim of ensuring equitable mathematics learning of the highest quality for all students.  NCTM invites proposals for its Pre-K-6 Classroom Research Grants program, which supports classroom-based research in pre-college mathematics education in collaboration with college or university mathematics educators.  Grants of up to $6,000 will be awarded to mathematics educators or classroom teachers currently teaching mathematics at the pre-K–6 level. The research must be a significant collaborative effort involving a college or university mathematics educator (a mathematics education researcher or a teacher of mathematics learning, teaching, or curriculum) and one or more pre-K–6 classroom teachers. The proposal may include but is not restricted to research related to curriculum development and implementation; involvement of at-risk or minority students; students' thinking about a particular mathematics concept or set of concepts; connection of mathematics to other disciplines; focused learning and teaching of mathematics with embedded use of technology (any acquisition of equipment must support the proposed plan but not be the primary focus of the grant); and/or innovative assessment or evaluation strategies.  Involvement of preservice teachers is encouraged but not required. The research should lead to a draft article suitable for submission in the Mathematics Teacher Educator, Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, or in one of the other NCTM school journals. In addition, proposals must address the following: research design, the plan for collecting and analyzing data, and the anticipated impact on student learning.  To be eligible, applicants must be a current NCTM member (on or before October 15, 2016) or teach at a school having current NCTM pre-K-8 school membership. The college or university mathematics educator also must be a member of NCTM.  For complete program guidelines and application instructions, visit NCTM online: http://www.nctm.org/Grants-and-Awards/Grants/Pre-K-6-Classroom-Research-Grants/

 

 

Rolling                          Mellon Slavic Studies Initiative   Russian, East European, and Central Asian studies are the focus of this joint publishing initiative supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation in offered in partnership with Northwestern, Pittsburgh, and Wisconsin university presses.  Northwestern seeks studies of Slavic literature, art, and culture; Pittsburgh is looking for projects in the social, political, environmental, urban, and cultural history of the former Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia; Wisconsin is especially interested in cultural and intellectual history, literary and film studies, anthropology, and human rights, with a focus on Russia and Eastern Europe.  For program details, please visit:                

http://www.mellonslavicstudies.org/submissions.htm

 

    

SOME UPCOMING DEADLINES FOR EXTRAMURAL FUNDING

NATURAL SCIENCES, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING & MATHEMATICS

 

OCTOBER 1                   The Whitehall Foundation assists scholarly research in the life sciences through its research grants and grants-in-aid programs. It is the Foundation’s policy to support those areas of basic biological research that are not heavily supported by federal agencies or other foundations with a specialized mission. The foundation also emphasizes the support of young scientists at the beginning of their careers and productive senior scientists who wish to move into new fields of interest.

 

1) Research: Research grants of up to $225,000 over three years will be awarded to established scientists of all ages working at an accredited institution in the United States. Grants will not be awarded to investigators who have already received, or expect to receive, substantial support from other sources, even if it is for an unrelated purpose.

2) Grants-in-Aid: One-year grants of up to $30,000 will be awarded to researchers at the assistant professor level who experience difficulty in competing for research funds because they have not yet become firmly established. Grants-in-Aid can also be made to senior scientists.

Letters of Intent must be received no later than October 1, 2017. Upon review, selected applicants will be invited to submit a full application by February 15, 2018.  For complete program guidelines, information about previous grant recipients, and application procedures, see the Whitehall Foundation website:  http://www.whitehall.org/grants/

 

 

OCTOBER 5                   The Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University is accepting applications for its 2018-2019 Fellowship Program.  Stipends of up to $77,500 for one year with additional funds for project expenses will be awarded to individuals working in the creative arts, humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and mathematics to pursue projects within their fields. In addition, some support for relocation expenses is provided where relevant.  Fellows receive office or studio space and access to libraries and other resources of Harvard University during the fellowship year, which runs from early September 2018 through May 31, 2019.  Radcliffe Fellows are expected to devote themselves full time to the work outlined in their proposal. Since this is a residential fellowship, fellows are expected to reside in the Boston area the fellowship period and to have their primary office at the institute to participate fully in the life of the community.  The deadline for applications in the natural sciences and mathematics is October 5, 2017.  Visit the Radcliffe Institute website for complete program guidelines and application instructions: https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/fellowship-program/how-apply

 

OCTOBER 25                 National Science Foundation (NSF) Integrative Activities in Physics Program supports activities in conjunction with NSF-wide programs such as Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER), Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU), and programs aimed at women, minorities, and persons with disabilities. Further information about all of these programs and activities is available in the Crosscutting Investment Strategies section of the NSF Guide to Programs.  The program also supports activities that seek to improve the education and training of physics students (both undergraduate and graduate), such as curriculum development or physics education research directed towards upper-level or graduate physics courses, and activities that are not included in specific programs elsewhere within NSF. The program supports research at the interface between physics and other disciplines and extending to emerging areas. Broadening activities related to research at the interface with other fields, possibly not normally associated with physics, also may be considered.

Multiple NSF grant programs are open!  See the complete list of opportunities and deadlines here: https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_list.jsp?org=NSF&ord=date

 

OCTOBER 25                 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Academic Research Enhancement Awards (AREA) stimulate research in educational institutions that provide baccalaureate or advanced degrees in sciences but that have not been major recipients of NIH support. AREA grants create opportunities for scientists and institutions otherwise unlikely to participate extensively in NIH research programs to contribute to the Nation's biomedical and behavioral research effort. AREA grants are intended to support small-scale research projects proposed by faculty members of eligible, domestic institutions, to expose undergraduate and/or graduate students to meritorious research projects, and to strengthen the research environment of the applicant’s home institution. Visit NIH online for details: https://area.nih.gov/

New to NIH’s grantmaking?  Read all about it here: https://grants.nih.gov/grants/about_grants.htm

 

NOVEMBER 3                 The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) supports teachers with the aim of ensuring equitable mathematics learning of the highest quality for all students.  NCTM invites proposals for its Pre-K-6 Classroom Research Grants program, which supports classroom-based research in pre-college mathematics education in collaboration with college or university mathematics educators.  Grants of up to $6,000 will be awarded to mathematics educators or classroom teachers currently teaching mathematics at the pre-K–6 level. The research must be a significant collaborative effort involving a college or university mathematics educator (a mathematics education researcher or a teacher of mathematics learning, teaching, or curriculum) and one or more pre-K–6 classroom teachers. The proposal may include but is not restricted to research related to curriculum development and implementation; involvement of at-risk or minority students; students' thinking about a particular mathematics concept or set of concepts; connection of mathematics to other disciplines; focused learning and teaching of mathematics with embedded use of technology (any acquisition of equipment must support the proposed plan but not be the primary focus of the grant); and/or innovative assessment or evaluation strategies.  Involvement of preservice teachers is encouraged but not required. The research should lead to a draft article suitable for submission in the Mathematics Teacher Educator, Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, or in one of the other NCTM school journals. In addition, proposals must address the following: research design, the plan for collecting and analyzing data, and the anticipated impact on student learning.  To be eligible, applicants must be a current NCTM member (on or before October 15, 2016) or teach at a school having current NCTM pre-K-8 school membership. The college or university mathematics educator also must be a member of NCTM.  For complete program guidelines and application instructions, visit NCTM online: http://www.nctm.org/Grants-and-Awards/Grants/Pre-K-6-Classroom-Research-Grants/

FEBRUARY 15, 2018                 AMBRF/Foundation for Alcohol Research invites applications from research projects focused on the effects of alcohol consumption on human health and behavior.  The Foundation encourages basic and clinical research, including epidemiology. Examples of valid topics include factors influencing underage drinking, the mechanisms of alcohol-related organ injury, fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, and the effects of alcohol on general health. Areas of particular interest include studies on how particular patterns of consumption (quantity of alcohol consumed, types of alcoholic beverages consumed, frequency of consumption, and context) are related to health and behavioral outcomes; and interdisciplinary, bioinformatics, and other approaches to genetic and environmental factors that influence the patterns of consumption of alcoholic beverages and related consequences.  Priority is given to projects led by young investigators.  Grants of up to $75,000 a year will be awarded for either one or two years.  See the AMBRF/Foundation for Alcohol Research website for complete program guidelines and application instructions: http://www.abmrf.org/appyling_grant

 

Rolling                          The Simons Foundation invites Letters of Intent for its new Targeted Grants in Mathematics and Physical Sciences program, intended to support high-risk projects of exceptional promise and scientific importance on a case-by-case basis. For projects with principal investigators at different institutions, the LOI should be submitted by the lead PI and his/her institution.  Applicants will be notified within two months of the submission of the LOI.  See the Simons Foundation website for complete program guidelines and application instructions: https://www.simonsfoundation.org/funding/funding-opportunities/mathematics-physical-sciences/targeted-grants-in-mps/

 

 

 

Questions about funding for research and scholarship?   Contact us:

 

Judith Dollenmayer  (5376, judollenmayer)

               Associate Director, Corporate, Foundation & Government Relations

Katherine Hite  (7661, kahite)

              Professor of Political Science & Faculty Director of Research Development

Gary Hohenberger  (7092, gahohenberger)

               Associate Vice President, Corporate, Foundation & Government Relations

Lori McElduff  (5490, lomcelduff)      

               Grants Office Specialist

Patricia Pritchard  (5893, papritchard)

                Director, Grants Accounting

Amanda Thornton  (5309, amthornton)

               Director, Grants Administration